The Project Value Tracking Process at Deutsche Telekom Laboratories

  • Heinrich Arnold
  • Michael Erner
  • Peter Möckel
  • Christopher Schläffer

Abstract

So far, many innovation organizations steer their activities on a cost base due to a lack of quantitative measurements for the business effect of technology transfers. Deutsche Telekom Laboratories has created a method to quantify the economic effect of its research and innovation results. A parallel process focused on the measurement of the value contributions of innovation projects accompanies projects during their execution and transfer phase. The value tracking process makes it possible to obtain an accurate picture not only of the economic value of the successfully transferred results but also of the take-up of every single result of the R&D project portfolio in the operational unit. Value tracking has moved Deutsche Telekom Laboratories even more toward a result-oriented and resource-efficient research and innovation unit.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heinrich Arnold
    • 1
  • Michael Erner
    • 1
  • Peter Möckel
    • 1
  • Christopher Schläffer
    • 2
  1. 1.LaboratoriesDeutsche Telekom AGBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Deutsche Telekom AGBonnGermany

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