Step by Step Framework for Evaluation of In-Formation Technology Benefit in Social Scenarios

  • Esteban Vaquerizo
  • Yolanda Garrido
  • Jorge Falcó
  • Theresa Skehan
  • Alba Jiménez
  • Roberto Casas
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 19)

Abstract

Evaluation of IT with end users is necessary to create systems that provide real benefit to society. Usually, evaluation is considered only as a trial of technology with users simply responding to questionnaires. Nevertheless, the process implies many aspects that should not be overlooked. In this paper we present a detailed framework that attempts to present all the mandatory and advisable issues that should be addressed in an evaluation of IT with users. This framework is valid for laboratory tests, and is also specifically recommended for social scenarios; for example day centers, user’s dwellings, etc. This framework is being used in a European project where hundreds of users test technology in different scenarios.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esteban Vaquerizo
    • 1
  • Yolanda Garrido
    • 1
  • Jorge Falcó
    • 1
  • Theresa Skehan
    • 2
  • Alba Jiménez
    • 1
  • Roberto Casas
    • 1
  1. 1.Tecnodiscap GroupUniversity of ZaragozaZaragozaSpain
  2. 2.Swedish Institute of Assistive TechnologyVinstaSweden

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