MNISIKLIS:Indoor Location Based Services for All

  • Vassilis Papataxiarhis
  • Vivi Riga
  • Vangelis Nomikos
  • Odysseas Sekkas
  • Kostas Kolomvatsos
  • Vassileios Tsetsos
  • Panagiotis Papageorgas
  • Stelios Vourakis
  • Vasileios Xouris
  • Stathes Hadjiefthymiades
  • Georgios Kouroupetroglou
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

MNISIKLIS is an integrated system aiming to provide universal, indoor locationbased services focusing on navigation. This paper presents the overall MNISIKLIS architecture and certain implementation details. In the context of the Design for All approach, the system targets to the support of several types of users, including persons with disabilities as well as elderly, by exploiting multimodal interaction. Moreover, the system implements effi cient path fi nding algorithms and provides advanced user experience through highly personalized services. MNISIKLIS adopts Semantic Web technologies (e.g., ontologies and reasoning methods) for representing an d managing application models. Furthermore, MNISIKLIS exploits modern positioning techniques in order to achieve high quality positioning. The paper discusses the algorithms and the models that accommodate the services provided by the system. Additionally, an analysis of the positioning subsystem, the user interaction subsystem and the peripheral infrastructure is given. Hence, a new paradigm in the area of location-based systems is presented.

Keywords

indoor navigation ontology RFID dead reckoning multimodal interaction 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aarts E, Harwig R, Schuurmans M (2001) Ambient intelligence. In The Invisible Future: The Seamless Integration of Technology into Everyday Life, McGraw-Hill Professional.Google Scholar
  2. Baus J, Krüger A, Wahlster W (2002) A Resource – Adaptive Mobile Navigation System, International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces IUI02, San Francisco, USA.Google Scholar
  3. Bikakis A, Patkos T, Antoniou G, Papadopouli M, Plexousakis D (2006) A Semantic-based Framework for Context-aware Pedestrian Guiding Services, 2nd International Workshop on Semantic Web Technology For Ubiquitous and Mobile Applications (SWUMA), Riva del Garda, Trentino, Italy.Google Scholar
  4. Boiko B (2005) Content Management Bible, 2nd Edition, Wiley Publishing Inc., 2005.Google Scholar
  5. Dippold M (2006) Personal Dead Reckoning with Accelerometers, Third International Forum on Applied Wearable Computing, IFAWC2006, Bremen, Germany.Google Scholar
  6. Duckham M, Kulik L (2003) "Simplest" Paths: Automated route selection for navigation, in: W. Kuhn, M.F. Worboys, S. Timpf (Eds.), Spatial Information Theory: Foundations of Geographic Information Science, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 2825, Springer, Berlin, 2003, pp. 182–199.Google Scholar
  7. Evennou F, Marx F (2006) Advanced Integration ofWiFi and Inertial Navigation Systems for Indoor Mobile Positioning, EURASIP Journal on Applied Signal Processing, Volume 2006, Article ID 86706, Pages 1–11.Google Scholar
  8. Fang L, Antsaklis PJ, Montestruque LA, McMickell MB, Lemmon M, Sun Y, Fang H, Koutroulis I, Haenggi M, Xie M, Xie X (2005) Design of a Wireless Assisted Pedestrian Dead Reckoning System – The NavMote Experience, IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, vol. 54, pp. 2342–2358.Google Scholar
  9. Fellbaum K, Kouroupetroglou G (2008) Principles of Electronic Speech Processing with Applications for People with Disabilities, J. Technology a Disability, Vol 20, No 2, 55–85.Google Scholar
  10. Freitas D, Kouroupetroglou G (2008) Speech Technologies for Blind and Low Vision Persons, Journal Technology and Disability, Vol. 20, No 2, pp. 135–156.Google Scholar
  11. Gartner G, Frank A, Retscher G (2004) Pedestrian Navigation System for Mixed Indoor/ Outdoor Environments – The NAVIO Project. In: Schrenk, M. (Ed.): Proceedings of the CORP 2004 and Geomultimedia04 Symposium(pp. 165–171). Vienna, Austria.Google Scholar
  12. Horrocks I, Patel-Schneider PF, Boley H, Tabet S, Grosof B, Dean M (2004) SWRL: A Semantic Web Rule Language Combining OWL and RuleML W3C Member Submission. [Online]. Available from http://www.w3.org/Submission/SWRL/ [6th June 2008].
  13. ICF, International Classifi cation of Functioning, Disability and Health (2001) World Health Organization, Geneva. http://www3.who.int/icf/icftemplate.cfm [6th June 2008].
  14. INO (Indoor Navigation Ontology) (2008) [Online]. Available from http://p-comp.di.uoa.gr/ ont/INO.owl [Accessed: 6th June 2008].
  15. Kargl F, Bernauer A (2005) The compass location system. In: Strang T, Linnhoff-Popien C (eds.) LoCA 2005. LNCS, vol. 3479, Springer, Heidelberg.Google Scholar
  16. Kargl F, Gessler S, Flerlage F (2007) The iNAV Indoor Navigation System, Lecture Notes In Computer Science, Springer.Google Scholar
  17. Kikiras P, Tsetsos V, Hadjiefthymiades S (2006) Ontology-based User Modeling for Pedestrian Navigation Systems, ECAI 2006 Workshop on Ubiquitous User Modeling (UbiqUM), Riva del Garda, Italy.Google Scholar
  18. Koide S, Kato M (2006) 3-D Human Navigation System with Consideration of Neighboring Space Information, 2006 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, (pp. 1693-11698), October 8–11, 2006, Taipei, Taiwan.Google Scholar
  19. Kolomvatsos K, Papataxiarhis V, Tsetsos V (2007) Semantic Location Based Services for Smart Spaces, in Proc. of the 2nd International Conference on Metadata and Semantics Research (MTSR), Corfu, Greece.Google Scholar
  20. Ladetto Q, Gabaglio V, Merminod B, Terrier P, Schutz Y (2000) Human Walking Analysis Assisted by DGPS, GNSS, Ediburgh, 1–4 May.Google Scholar
  21. Lyardet F, Grimmer J, Muhlhauser M (2006) CoINS: Context Sensitive Indoor Navigation System, Proceedings of the Eighth IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia, pp. 209–218, 2006, IEEE Computer Society Washington, DC, USA.Google Scholar
  22. OWL (Web Ontology Language) Guide (2004) [Online]. Available from http://www.w3.org/ TR/owl-guide [Accessed: 6th June 2008].
  23. Schiller J, Voisard A (2004) Location-Based Services, Morgan-Kaufmann Publications.Google Scholar
  24. Sekkas O, Hadjiefthymiades S, Zervas E (2006) Enhancing location estimation through data fusion, in Proceedings of the 17th IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications (PIMRC ‘06), pp. 1–5, Helsinki, Finland.Google Scholar
  25. Stephanidis C (2001) User Interfaces for All – Concepts, Methods, and Tools, Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  26. Tsetsos V, Anagnostopoulos C, Kikiras P, Hadjieftymiades S (2006) Semantically Enriched Navigation for Indoor Environments, International Journal of Web and Grid Services (IJWGS), Vol.4, No.2,Inderscience Publ.Google Scholar
  27. Wasinger R, Stahl C, Krüger A (2003) M3I in a Pedestrian Navigation & Exploration System, Proc. of the Fourth International Symposium on Human Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices, pp. 481–485, Pisa, Italy.Google Scholar
  28. Weinberg H (2008) Using the ADXL202 in Pedometer and Personal Navigation Applications, Application Notes AN-602, Analog Devices, [Online]. Available from http://www.analog. com/UploadedFiles/Application_Notes/513772624AN602.pdf , [6th June 2008].
  29. XMLBIF, The Interchange Format for Bayesian Networks (1998) Available from http://www. cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/user/fgcozman/www/Research/InterchangeFormat/ [6th June 2008].

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vassilis Papataxiarhis
    • 1
  • Vivi Riga
    • 1
  • Vangelis Nomikos
    • 1
  • Odysseas Sekkas
    • 1
  • Kostas Kolomvatsos
    • 1
  • Vassileios Tsetsos
    • 1
  • Panagiotis Papageorgas
    • 1
  • Stelios Vourakis
    • 1
  • Vasileios Xouris
    • 1
  • Stathes Hadjiefthymiades
    • 1
  • Georgios Kouroupetroglou
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Informatics and TelecommunicationsNational and Kapodistrian University of AthensGreece

Personalised recommendations