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Long Bone X-Ray Image Stitching Using Camera Augmented Mobile C-Arm

  • Lejing Wang
  • Joerg Traub
  • Sandro Michael Heining
  • Selim Benhimane
  • Ekkehard Euler
  • Rainer Graumann
  • Nassir Navab
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5242)

Abstract

X-ray images are widely used during surgery for long bone fracture fixation. Mobile C-arms provide X-ray images which are used to determine the quality of trauma reduction, i.e. the extremity length and mechanical axis of long bones. Standard X-ray images have a narrow field of view and can not visualize the entire long bone on a single image. In this paper, we propose a novel method to generate panoramic X-ray images in real time by using the previously introduced Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm [1]. This advanced mobile C-arm system acquires registered X-ray and optical images by construction, which facilitates the generation of panoramic X-ray images based on first stitching the optical images and then embedding the X-ray images. We additionally introduce a method to reduce the parallax effect that leads to the blurring and measurement error on panoramic X-ray images. Visual marker tracking is employed to automatically stitch the sequence of video images and to rectify images. Our proposed method is suitable for intra-operative usage generating panoramic X-ray images, which enable metric measurements, with less radiation and without requirement of fronto-parallel setup and overlapping X-ray images. The results show that the panoramic X-ray images generated by our method are accurate enough (errors less than 1%) for metric measurements and suitable for many clinical applications in trauma reduction.

Keywords

Augmented Reality Video Image Mechanical Axis Panoramic Image Bone Plane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Supplementary material

Electronic Supplementary Material (7,046 KB)

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lejing Wang
    • 1
  • Joerg Traub
    • 1
  • Sandro Michael Heining
    • 2
  • Selim Benhimane
    • 1
  • Ekkehard Euler
    • 2
  • Rainer Graumann
    • 3
  • Nassir Navab
    • 1
  1. 1.Chair for Computer Aided Medical Procedures (CAMP)TU MunichGermany
  2. 2.Trauma Surgery Department, Klinikum InnenstadtLMU MunichGermany
  3. 3.Siemens SP, Siemens Medical SolutionsErlangenGermany

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