Advertisement

Social Responses to Virtual Humans: Automatic Over-Reliance on the "Human" Category

  • Sung Park
  • Richard Catrambone
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5208)

Abstract

In the human computer interaction (HCI) literature, responding socially to virtual humans means that people exhibit behavioral responses to virtual humans as if they are humans. Based partly on the work of Nass and his colleagues (for a review, see [1]), there is general agreement in the research community that people do respond socially to virtual humans. What seems to be vital, in terms of understanding why people respond socially to virtual humans, is how we respond socially to another person and how we know about others’ temporary states (e.g., emotions, intentions) and enduring dispositions (e.g., beliefs, abilities).

Keywords

Social Response Human Computer Interaction Social Cognitive Theory Stimulus Object Attribution Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Moon, Y., Nass, C.: Machines and Mindlessness: Social Responses to Computers. Journal of Social Issues 56(1), 81–103 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gilbert, D.: Ordinary Personology. In: Gilbert, D., Fiske, S., Lindzey, G. (eds.) The Handbook of Social Psychology, vol. 2, pp. 89–150. Oxford University Press, NY (1998)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fiske, S.: Stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. In: Gilbert, D., Fiske, S., Lindzey, G. (eds.) The Handbook of Social Psychology, vol. 2, pp. 89–150. Oxford University Press, NY (1998)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bargh, J.A.: Conditional automaticity: varieties of automatic influence in social perception and cognition. In: Uleman, J.S., Bargh, J.A. (eds.) Unintended thought, pp. 3–51. Guilford, NY (1989)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Feldman, J.M.: Four questions about human social behavior. In: Adamopoulos, J., Kashima, Y. (eds.) Social Psychology and Cultural Context: Essays in Honor of Harry C. Triandis. Sage, NY (1999)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sung Park
    • 1
  • Richard Catrambone
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Psychology Graphics, Visualization, and Usability Center (GVU)Georgia Institute of Technology 

Personalised recommendations