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Downward Continuation of Airborne Gravimetry and Gradiometry Data Using Space Localizing Spline Functions

  • F Mueller
  • T Mayer-Gürr
  • A.A Makhloof
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 133)

Abstract

Airborne gravimetry is capable of filling the gap between the long wavelength parts of the gravity field provided by the satellite missions such as CHAMP or GRACE and the short wavelength parts derived from terrestrial data. Furthermore, airborne gravimetry techniques are not restricted to continental areas and are not subjected to certain limitations in contrast to terrestrial data. Considering optimal conditions the measurement accuracy varies around 1–2 mGal for a spatial resolution of approximately 2 km

In order to achieve this accuracy the downward continuation process in connection with the representation of the gravity field functionals becomes of special importance. In this paper we would like to present the use of space localizing spline functions and their effect on the downward continuation process. The use of the presented approach is demonstrated on simulated airborne gravimetry data as well as on airborne gradiometry data. After all the spline-method is applied to a real gravity field composed of upward continued terrestrial gravity data

Keywords

Downward continuation Space localizing base function Airborne gravimetry Airborne gradiometry 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • F Mueller
    • 1
  • T Mayer-Gürr
    • 1
  • A.A Makhloof
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Theoretical GeodesyUniversity of BonnNussallee 17Germany

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