Video Game Audio Prototyping with Half-Life 2

  • Leonard J. Paul
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 7)

Abstract

This paper describes how to utilize the Half-Life 2 (HL2) Source engine and Open Sound Control (OSC) to communicate real-time sound event calls to a Pure Data (PD) sound driver. Game events are sent from Half-Life 2 to the PD patch via OSC which triggers the sound across a network. The advantage of this approach is that the PD sound driver can have both the sample data and the sound behaviors modified in real-time, thus avoiding the conventional need for a lengthy recompilation stage. This technique allows for rapid iterative game audio sound design through prototyping which increases the efficiency of the work-flow of the game sound artist working on the current seventh-generation consoles and PC video games. This method is also of interest to researchers of game audio who wish to experiment with novel game audio techniques within the context of a game while it is running.

Keywords

Video game audio video games prototyping Half-Life 2 Open Sound Control OSC game coding game audio research 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard J. Paul
    • 1
  1. 1.Lotus AudioVancouverCanada

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