Knowledge Management Paradigms in Selected Manufacturing Case Studies

  • George Chryssolouris
  • Dimitris Mourtzis
  • Nikolaos Papakostas
  • Z. Papachatzakis
  • Stathes Xeromerites

Abstract

Knowledge Management (KM) refers to a range of practices and techniques used by organizations to identify, represent and distribute information, knowledge, know-how, expertise and other forms of knowledge for leverage, utilization, reuse and transfer of knowledge across the enterprise. This chapter presents and discusses some typical knowledge management cases for the planning and scheduling problems of real manufacturing systems. The formalization of the captured knowledge and experience of the personnel, and their inclusion in a modern software system to support the production planning and scheduling processes was the common objective in the three presented case studies. The specifics of each case, the approach, the implementation and the results are presented and discussed

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Chryssolouris
    • 1
  • Dimitris Mourtzis
    • 1
  • Nikolaos Papakostas
    • 1
  • Z. Papachatzakis
    • 1
  • Stathes Xeromerites
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems and Automation (LMS), Department of Mechanical Engineering and AeronauticsUniversity of PatrasPatrasGreece

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