Market Engineering: A Research Agenda

  • Henner Gimpel
  • Nicholas R. Jennings
  • Gregory E. Kersten
  • Axel Ockenfels
  • Christof Weinhardt
Part of the Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing book series (LNBIP, volume 2)

Abstract

Market engineering is the discipline of making markets work. It encompasses the use of legal frameworks, economic mechanisms, management science models, and information and communication technologies for the purposes of: (i) designing and constructing forums where goods and services can be bought and sold and (ii) providing services associated with buying and selling. Against this background, this paper sets out the need for a coherent and encompassing agenda in this area and highlights the key constituent building blocks.

Keywords

Markets Auctions Negotiations Economic Engineering 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henner Gimpel
    • 1
  • Nicholas R. Jennings
    • 2
  • Gregory E. Kersten
    • 3
  • Axel Ockenfels
    • 4
  • Christof Weinhardt
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Information Systems and ManagementUniversity of KarlsruheGermany
  2. 2.School of Electronics and Computer ScienceUniversity of SouthamptonUK
  3. 3.InterNeg Research CentreConcordia UniversityCanada
  4. 4.University of CologneGermany

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