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Equidecomposable Quadratic Regions

  • Thomas C. Hales
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4869)

Abstract

This article describes an algorithm that decides whether a region in three dimensions, described by quadratic constraints, is equidecomposable with a collection of primitive regions. When a decomposition exists, the algorithm finds the volume of the given region. Applications to the ‘Flyspeck’ project are discussed.

Keywords

Irreducible Component Boundary Curve Great Circle Tangent Plane Rigid Motion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas C. Hales
    • 1
  1. 1.Math Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 

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