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Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA): A new name for a new discipline

  • G. J. Hay
  • G. Castilla
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

What is Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA)? To answer this we provide a formal definition of GEOBIA, present a brief account of its coining, and propose a key objective for this new discipline. We then, conduct a SWOT1 analysis of its potential, and discuss its main tenets and plausible future. Much still remains to be accomplished.

Keywords

Modifiable Areal Unit Problem Plausible Future Remote Sense Image Analysis Hierarchical Patch Dynamics Spatial Information Science 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. J. Hay
    • 1
  • G. Castilla
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeographyUniversity of CalgaryCalgary

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