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Genetic and Ecological Determinants of Primate Social Systems

  • Peter M. Kappeler

Kin-selection theory provides an evolutionary framework for the analysis of the effects of genetic relatedness on animal social systems. The aim of this chapter is to review postulated causal relationships between kinship patterns and social systems in non-human primates. In this context it is crucial to distinguish between social organization, i.e., the size and composition of a social unit, and its social structure, i.e., the pattern of social interactions among the members of a social unit. Current theories about the determinants of primate social systems yield predictions about where and why relatives should live together. Results of the available studies of the genetic structure of primate societies indicate deviations in several cases from expected patterns, however. The socioecological model, which has been widely used to analyze and explain relationships among ecological, social and genetic factors, on the one hand, and social structure, on the other hand, has therefore presumably overestimated the effects of kinship on primate social systems.

Keywords

Primate Society Behav Ecol Female Philopatry Ecological Determinant Microcebus Murinus 
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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Kappeler
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. SociobiologyUniversity of GöttingenGermany

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