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Orthopedics Surgery Trainer with PPU-Accelerated Blood and Tissue Simulation

  • Wai-Man Pang
  • Jing Qin
  • Yim-Pan Chui
  • Tien-Tsin Wong
  • Kwok-Sui Leung
  • Pheng-Ann Heng
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4792)

Abstract

This paper presents a novel orthopedics surgery training system with both the components for modeling as well as simulating the deformation and visualization in an efficient way. By employing techniques such as optimization, segmentation and center line extraction, the modeling of deformable model can be completed with minimal manual involvement. The novel trainer can simulate rigid body, soft tissue and blood with state-of-the-art techniques, so that convincing deformation and realistic bleeding can be achieved. More important, newly released Physics Processing Unit (PPU) is adopted to tackle the high requirement for physics related computations. Experiment shows that the acceleration gain from PPU is significant for maintaining interactive frame rate under a complex surgical environments of orthopedics surgery.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wai-Man Pang
    • 1
  • Jing Qin
    • 1
  • Yim-Pan Chui
    • 1
  • Tien-Tsin Wong
    • 1
  • Kwok-Sui Leung
    • 2
  • Pheng-Ann Heng
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong 
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, CUHK 
  3. 3.Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Integration Technology, Chinese Academy of Science/CUHK 

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