Detection and Segmentation of Pathological Structures by the Extended Graph-Shifts Algorithm

  • Jason J. Corso
  • Alan Yuille
  • Nancy L. Sicotte
  • Arthur W. Toga
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-75757-3_119

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4791)
Cite this paper as:
Corso J.J., Yuille A., Sicotte N.L., Toga A.W. (2007) Detection and Segmentation of Pathological Structures by the Extended Graph-Shifts Algorithm. In: Ayache N., Ourselin S., Maeder A. (eds) Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI 2007. MICCAI 2007. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 4791. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

We propose an extended graph-shifts algorithm for image segmentation and labeling. This algorithm performs energy minimization by manipulating a dynamic hierarchical representation of the image. It consists of a set of moves occurring at different levels of the hierarchy where the types of move, and the level of the hierarchy, are chosen automatically so as to maximally decrease the energy. Extended graph-shifts can be applied to a broad range of problems in medical imaging. In this paper, we apply extended graph-shifts to the detection of pathological brain structures: (i) segmentation of brain tumors, and (ii) detection of multiple sclerosis lesions. The energy terms in these tasks are learned from training data by statistical learning algorithms. We demonstrate accurate results, precision and recall in the order of 93%, and also show that the algorithm is computationally efficient, segmenting a full 3D volume in about one minute.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jason J. Corso
    • 1
  • Alan Yuille
    • 2
  • Nancy L. Sicotte
    • 3
  • Arthur W. Toga
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Computational Biology, Laboratory of Neuro Imaging 
  2. 2.Department of Statistics 
  3. 3.Department of Neurology, Division of Brain Mapping, University of California, Los AngelesUSA

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