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Acute Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy (APMPPE)

  • Carl P. HerbortJr.
  • Alessandro Mantovani

Abstract

Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) like other inflammatory entities of the choriocapillaris was included in the purely descriptive pot-pourri group of white dot syndromes, a classification that nowadays has no reason to be maintained. As for many fundus diseases, it was J. Donald M. Gass who first described the disease in 1968. He called the disease acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) because he thought that the disease was due to an acute cellular response on the part of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to a local noxious agent. In 1971, van Buskirk et al. suggested choriocapillaris perfusion as the underlying disorder. In 1972 and again in 1977 and 1983, Deutman and colleagues, based on the choriocapillaris nonperfusion seen on early FA frames, indicated that it was the choriocapillaris rather than the RPE that was primarily involved, and they suggested to rename the disease as “acute multifocal ischaemic choriocapillaropathy” (AMIC). With the aid of indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), Dhaliwal et al. identified choriocapillaris nonperfusion as the primary event in APMPPE.

APMPPE predominantly occurs in young individuals during the second to fourth decade of life.

Keywords

Optical Coherence Tomography Retinal Pigment Epithelium Fluorescein Angiography Serous Retinal Detachment Visual Field Testing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Supplementary material

118191_1_En_79_MOESM1_ESM.pptx (18.9 mb)
Case Report 83 Acute placoid multifocal posterior pigment epitheliopathy (PPTX 19398 kb)
118191_1_En_79_MOESM2_ESM.pptx (694 kb)
Case Report 87 Acute placoid multifocal posterior pigment epitheliopathy (PPTX 694 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Ophthalmic Specialised Care (COS)LausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of LausanneLausanneSwitzerland
  3. 3.Ophthalmology UnitOspedale ValduceComoItaly

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