Future Perspectives: The Car and Its IP-Address – A Potential Safety and Security Risk Assessment

  • Andreas Lang
  • Jana Dittmann
  • Stefan Kiltz
  • Tobias Hoppe
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4680)

Abstract

The fast growing Internet technology has affected many areas of human life. As it offers a convenient and widely accepted approach for communication and service distribution it is expected to continue its influence to future system design. Motivated from this successful spreading we assume hypothetical scenarios in our paper, whereby automotive components might also be influenced by omnipresent communication in near future. If such a development would take place it becomes important to investigate the influence to security and safety aspects. Based on today’s wide variety of Internet based security attacks our goal is therefore to simulate and analyze potential security risks and their impact to safety constraints when cars would become equipped and connected with an IP based protocol via unique IP addresses. Therefore, our work should motivate the inserting of security mechanisms into the design, implementation and configuration of the car IT systems from the beginning of the development, which we substantiate by practical demo attacks on recent automotive technology.

Keywords

Security Safety Automotive Future Vision 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Howard, J.D., Longstaff, T.A.: A Common Language for Computer Security Incidents (SAND98-8667); Sandia National Laboratories. 1998 (0-201-63346-9), Forschungsbericht (1998)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dittmann, J.: Course: Fundamentals of IT-Security, Summer Term 2005 (2005) Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Innovation Electronics (UK) Ltd., Health & Safety Laboratory: A methodology for the assignment of safety integrity levels (SILs) to safety-related control functions implemented by safety-related electrical, electronic and programmable electronic control systems of machines; Health and Safety Laboratory. Forschungsbericht (2004)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Anderson, R.: Security Engineering. In: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems.: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed System, Wiley, New York (2001)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Tulloch, M.: Microsoft Encyclopedia of Security. Microsoft Press (2003), ISBN 0-7356-1877-1Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Kiltz, S., Lang, A., Dittmann, J.: Klassifizierung der Eigenschaften von Trojanischen Pferden. In: Horster, P. (ed.) DACH Security 2006; Bestandsaufnahme, Konzepte, Anwendungen, Perspektiven; Syssec, Duesseldorf, Germany, pp. S. 351–361 (2006), ISBN: 3-00-018166-0 Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kaufman, C., Perlman, R., Speciner, M.: Network security: private communication in a public world. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA (2002)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Vector [CANoe und DENoe]: (June 2007), http://www.vector-informatik.com/vi_canoe_de,,2816.html

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Lang
    • 1
  • Jana Dittmann
    • 1
  • Stefan Kiltz
    • 1
  • Tobias Hoppe
    • 1
  1. 1.Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg, ITI Research Group on Multimedia and Security, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 MagdeburgGermany

Personalised recommendations