Noise Reduction at Urban Hot-Spots by Vehicle Noise Control

  • U. Orrenius
  • S. Leth
  • A. Frid
Part of the Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design book series (NNFM, volume 99)

Summary

In the present paper the potential for reducing noise exposure at “urban hot-spots” due to rail traffic is investigated. In particular vehicle based control measures are discussed including various measures against curve and brake squeal, intelligent fan speed regulation taking advantage of the thermal inertia of the systems to be cooled, choice of fan types and innovative energy storage devices. It is shown that dedicated measures on the vehicles can lead to significantly reduced emissions at locations where people are mostly disturbed.

For future decision making on urban noise control measures it is essential that the calculation models used must incorporate in sufficient detail the source mechanisms that are mostly relevant from a disturbance perspective.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Directive 2002/49/EC of 25 June 2002 relating to the assessment and management of environmental noise. Official Journal of the EC, L 189/12Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Technical specification for interoperability – Subsystem conventional rail rolling stock – Scope Noise – 23/12/2005. Official Journal of the EC (08.02.2006)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
    Asmussen, B., et al.: Status and perspectives of the “Specially Monitored Track”. Journal of Sound and Vibration 293(3-5) (2006)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Orrenius, U.: Feasibility study of clutch system for traction motor fans, NoV-SE-2007-002, Bombardier (InMAR) (2007)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Thoss, E., et al.: Optimierung der Schallemission von Schienenfahrzeugen mit “nicht” akustischen Massnahmen. In: DAGA (2007)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Steiner, M., Scholten, J.: Energy Storage on board railway vehicles. In: European Conference on Power Electronics and Applications, Dresden (2005)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Dittrich, M.: The Imagine Source Model for Railway Noise Prediction. Acta Acustica 93, 185–2002 (2007)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Moehler, U., et al.: The new German prediction model for railway noise Schall 03. In: Proceedings Euronoise 2006, Tampere, Finland (2006)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    de Beer, F.G., et al.: Curve squeal of rail bound vehicles (part1-3). In: Proceedings of Internoise 2000, Nice, France (2000)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Thompson, D.J., et al.: A Theoretical Model for Curve Squeal. ISVR TM 904 (February 2000)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Vincent, N., et al.: Curve squeal of urban rolling stock. Journal of Sound and Vibration 293(3-5) (June 2006)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Muller, B., Oertli, J.: Curve squeal of urban rolling stock. Journal of Sound and Vibration 293(3-5) (June 2006)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
  15. 15.
    Heckl, M.: Curve Squeal of Train Wheels, Part 3: Active Control. Journal of Sound and Vibration 229(3) (January 2000)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Ognar, M.: Investigations on curve squeal, internal report Bombardier Transportation (2006)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Eadie, D.T., Satoro, M.: Top-of-rail friction control for curve noise mitigation and corrugation rate reduction. Journal of Sound and Vibration 293(3-5) (June 2006)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Beier, M., et al.: Acoustical Investigations of Disc Brake Squeal. In: Proceedings Euronoise 2006, Tampere, Finland (2006)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Orrenius
    • 1
  • S. Leth
    • 1
  • A. Frid
    • 1
  1. 1.Bombardier Transportation, Specialist Engineering Mainline & CoC AcousticsVästeråsSweden

Personalised recommendations