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Selfish Search on Playing Shogi

  • Takeshi Ito
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4740)

Abstract

If a human faces a complex problem with a large number of potential solutions and calculations, he will not always act logically. In gamble, public lottery, etc., we see a mechanism by which a bookmaker makes a profit probable. There the chances of winning are always overestimated by the human player. For example, in public lottery, some people are allured by ungrounded rumors (such as "it is the turn of the sales store to win"). Other people take superstitious actions grounded on fortune-telling. A fully different example of irrational human decision making in games can be found in the domain of the imperfect information and the chance gambling game Mahjong. A recent study [1] evaluating game records of internet Mahjong concluded that some amateur players treat a professional’s remark like a proverb and believe it blindly in spite of a lack of evidence to support the proposition.

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Ito
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science, University of Electro-Communications, TokyoJapan

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