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“My Roomba Is Rambo”: Intimate Home Appliances

  • Ja-Young Sung
  • Lan Guo
  • Rebecca E. Grinter
  • Henrik I. Christensen
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4717)

Abstract

Robots have entered our domestic lives, but yet, little is known about their impact on the home. This paper takes steps towards addressing this omission, by reporting results from an empirical study of iRobot’s RoombaTM, a vacuuming robot. Our findings suggest that, by developing intimacy to the robot, our participants were able to derive increased pleasure from cleaning, and expended effort to fit Roomba into their homes, and shared it with others. These findings lead us to propose four design implications that we argue could increase people’s enthusiasm for smart home technologies.

Keywords

Empirical study home robot intimacy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ja-Young Sung
    • 1
  • Lan Guo
    • 1
  • Rebecca E. Grinter
    • 1
  • Henrik I. Christensen
    • 1
  1. 1.GVU Center & School of Interactive Computing, College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30308USA

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