Transferring a Collaborative Work Practice to Practitioners: A Field Study of the Value Frequency Model for Change-of-Practice

  • Robert O. Briggs
  • Alanah J. Davis
  • John D. Murphy
  • Lucas Steinhauser
  • Thomas F. Carlisle
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4715)

Abstract

Collaboration engineers design collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks and transfer them to practitioners to execute for themselves without the on-going intervention of professional facilitators. It would be useful to increase the predictability of developing self-sustaining and growing community of practice around these designed processes. This paper reports a field study that applies the Value Frequency Model (VFM) for change-of-practice to the deployment of an engineered work practice to groups in a large global organization. The results suggest that VFM provides useful insights for discovering candidate tasks for Collaboration Engineering (CE) interventions, for designing new work practices, and for designing transition interventions for creating a self-sustaining and growing community of practice.

Keywords

Collaboration engineering organizational change change of practice value frequency model acceptance adoption diffusion transition 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Anson, R.B., R.P., Wynne, B.E.: An Experiment Assessing Group Support System and Facilitator Effects on Meeting Outcomes. Management Science 41(2), 189–208 (1995)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Miranda, S.M.: Avoidance of groupthink: meeting management using group support systems. Small Group Research 25(1), 105–136 (1994)CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Briggs, R.O.V., de G.J., Nunamaker, Jr., J.F.: Collaboration Engineering with ThinkLets to Pursue Sustained Success with Group Support Systems. Journal of Management Information Systems 19(4), 31–64 (2003)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Vreede, G.J.D.K., G.L., Briggs, R.O.: ThinkLets: A Collaboration Engineering Pattern Language. International Journal of Computer Applications and Technology 25(2/3), 140–154 (2006)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kolfschoten, G.L.B., R.O., de Vreede, G.-J.: Appelman, J.H. Conceptual foundation of the ThinkLet concept for Collaboration Engineering. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 64(7), 611–627 (2006)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Briggs, R.O., Adkins, M., Mittleman, D., Kruse, J., Miller, S., Nunamaker Jr., J.F.: A technology transition model derived from field investigation of GSS use aboard the U.S.S. CORONADO. Journal of Management Information Systems 15(3), 151–195 (1998)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Briggs, R.O.: The value frequency model: Toward a theoretical understanding of organizational change. In: Seifert, S., Weinhardt, C. (eds.) Group Decision and Negatiation, Karlsruhe, Germany, pp. 36–39 (2006)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Argyris, C., Putnam, R., McLain Smith, D.: Action science - Concepts, methods and skills for research and intervention. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco (1982)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Briggs, R.O., Davis, A.J., Murphy, J.D.: Discovering and evaluating collaboration engineering opportunities. In: Briggs, R.O., Nunamaker, Jr., J.F. (eds.) HICSS 2007 Workshop on Collaboration Engineering (2007)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert O. Briggs
    • 1
  • Alanah J. Davis
    • 1
  • John D. Murphy
    • 1
  • Lucas Steinhauser
    • 1
  • Thomas F. Carlisle
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Collaboration Science, University of Nebraska at Omaha 
  2. 2.Science Applications International Corporation 

Personalised recommendations