Transferring a Collaborative Work Practice to Practitioners: A Field Study of the Value Frequency Model for Change-of-Practice

  • Robert O. Briggs
  • Alanah J. Davis
  • John D. Murphy
  • Lucas Steinhauser
  • Thomas F. Carlisle
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-74812-0_23

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4715)
Cite this paper as:
Briggs R.O., Davis A.J., Murphy J.D., Steinhauser L., Carlisle T.F. (2007) Transferring a Collaborative Work Practice to Practitioners: A Field Study of the Value Frequency Model for Change-of-Practice. In: Haake J.M., Ochoa S.F., Cechich A. (eds) Groupware: Design, Implementation, and Use. CRIWG 2007. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 4715. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Collaboration engineers design collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks and transfer them to practitioners to execute for themselves without the on-going intervention of professional facilitators. It would be useful to increase the predictability of developing self-sustaining and growing community of practice around these designed processes. This paper reports a field study that applies the Value Frequency Model (VFM) for change-of-practice to the deployment of an engineered work practice to groups in a large global organization. The results suggest that VFM provides useful insights for discovering candidate tasks for Collaboration Engineering (CE) interventions, for designing new work practices, and for designing transition interventions for creating a self-sustaining and growing community of practice.

Keywords

Collaboration engineering organizational change change of practice value frequency model acceptance adoption diffusion transition 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert O. Briggs
    • 1
  • Alanah J. Davis
    • 1
  • John D. Murphy
    • 1
  • Lucas Steinhauser
    • 1
  • Thomas F. Carlisle
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Collaboration Science, University of Nebraska at Omaha 
  2. 2.Science Applications International Corporation 

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