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A Uniform Handling of Different Landmark Types in Route Directions

  • Kai-Florian Richter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4736)

Abstract

Landmarks are crucial for human wayfinding. Their integration in wayfinding assistance systems is essential for generating cognitively ergonomic route directions. I present an approach to automatically determining references to different types of landmarks. This approach exploits the circular order of a decision point’s branches. It allows uniformly handling point landmarks as well as linear and areal landmarks; these may be functionally relevant for a single decision point or a sequence of decision points. The approach is simple, yet powerful and can handle different spatial situations. It is an integral part of Guard, a process generating context-specific route directions that adapts wayfinding instructions to a route’s properties and environmental characteristics. Guard accounts for cognitive principles of good route directions; the resulting route directions reflect people’s conceptualization of route information.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kai-Florian Richter
    • 1
  1. 1.Transregional Collaborative Research Center SFB/TR 8 Spatial Cognition, Universität BremenGermany

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