Phytochemical Standardization of Herbal Drugs and Polyherbal Formulations

  • M. Rajani
  • Niranjan S. Kanaki

Abstract

The recent global resurgence of interest in herbal medicines has led to an increase in the demand for them. Commercialization of the manufacture of these medicines to meet this increasing demand has resulted in a decline in their quality, primarily due to a lack of adequate regulations pertaining to this sector of medicine. The need of the hour is to evolve a systematic approach and to develop well-designed methodologies for the standardization of herbal raw materials and herbal formulations. In this chapter, various methods of phytochemical standardization, such as preliminary phytochemical screening, fingerprint profiling, and quantification of marker compound(s) with reference to herbal raw materials and polyherbal formulations, are discussed in detail and suitable examples are given.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Rajani
    • 1
  • Niranjan S. Kanaki
    • 1
  1. 1.B.V. Patel Pharmaceutical Education and Research Development (PERD) CentreThaltej, AhmedabadIndia

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