Using Adaptable Design to Classify Interactions Within a Distributed Control Architecture

  • Christopher Dan Fletcher
  • Robert William Brennan
  • Peihua Gu
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4659)

Abstract

In this paper we apply Adaptable Design (AD) theory to the problem of fault monitoring and recovery in real-time distributed control systems. The approach draws on the close match between the functional architecture of a modular mechanical design and the functional architecture of distributed mechatronic systems and is based on the classification of interactions between the modules in these systems. The results of this work show that AD theory is applicable to fault monitoring and recovery in real-time distributed control and also has the potential for broader applications in the design of distributed mechatronic systems.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Dan Fletcher
    • 1
  • Robert William Brennan
    • 1
  • Peihua Gu
    • 1
  1. 1.Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4Canada

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