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Erkrankungen und Therapieformen des unteren Gastrointestinaltrakts

  • J. Fuchs
  • K. -P. Zimmer
  • F. M. Rümmele
  • A. C. Hauer
  • S. Buderus
  • K. -M. Keller
  • D. von Schweinitz
  • F. Lacaille
  • O. Goulet
  • H. Müller
  • K. -L. Waag
  • C. Petersen

Auszug

Bei 30% aller intestinalen Obstruktionen des Neugeborenen findet man eine Darmatresie. Die Diagnose kann in 15–30% aller Fälle bereits pränatal gestellt werden. Atresien sind komplette Verschlüsse des Darmlumens, wogegen die Stenosen nur inkomplette Obstruktionen darstellen, sodass sich die klinischen Symptome verzögert offenbaren. In rund 15% aller Fälle treten mehrfache Atresien auf. Es existiert immer ein enormer Kaliberunterschied zwischen dem proximalen Darm und dem postatretischen »Hungerdarm«. Das Leitsymptom ist das gallige Erbrechen innerhalb der ersten Lebenstage. Die zystische Fibrose ist bei Kindern mit Dünndarmatresien 200fach häufiger anzutreffen.

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Copyright information

© Springer Medizin Verlag Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Fuchs
    • 1
  • K. -P. Zimmer
    • 2
  • F. M. Rümmele
    • 3
  • A. C. Hauer
    • 4
  • S. Buderus
    • 5
  • K. -M. Keller
    • 6
  • D. von Schweinitz
    • 7
  • F. Lacaille
    • 5
  • O. Goulet
    • 5
  • H. Müller
    • 8
  • K. -L. Waag
    • 9
  • C. Petersen
    • 10
  1. 1.Abteilung für Kinderchirurgie, Klinik für Kinderheilkunde und JugendmedizinUniversitätsklinikumTübingen
  2. 2.UniversitätskinderklinikGießen
  3. 3.Hôpital Necker Enfants MaladesParis Cedex 15France
  4. 4.Universitätsklinik für Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde GrazGrazÖsterreich
  5. 5.Kinder- und JugendmedizinSt.-Marien-HospitalBonn-Venusberg
  6. 6.Fachbereich KinderheilkundeDeutsche Klinik für DiagnostikWiesbaden
  7. 7.Kinderchirurgische Klinik und PoliklinikDr. von Haunersches KinderspitalMünchen
  8. 8.Klinikum Kempten-Oberallgäu GmbHKempten
  9. 9.Kinderchirurgische UniversitätsklinikMannheim
  10. 10.Kinderchirurgische Klinik der MHHHannover

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