Chapter

Gradients in a Tropical Mountain Ecosystem of Ecuador

Volume 198 of the series Ecological Studies pp 229-242

Altitudinal Changes in Stand Structure and Biomass Allocation of Tropical Mountain Forests in Relation to Microclimate and Soil Chemistry

  • G. MoserAffiliated withPlant Ecology, Albrecht von Haller Institute for Plant Sciences, University of Göttingen
  • , M. RödersteinAffiliated withPlant Ecology, Albrecht von Haller Institute for Plant Sciences, University of Göttingen
  • , N. SoetheAffiliated withDepartment of Plant Nutrition and Fertilization, Humboldt University of Berlin
  • , D. HertelAffiliated withPlant Ecology, Albrecht von Haller Institute for Plant Sciences, University of Göttingen
  • , C. LeuschnerAffiliated withPlant Ecology, Albrecht von Haller Institute for Plant Sciences, University of Göttingen

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In tropical montane forests, the decline of tree size with increasing elevation is a well recognized phenomenon (Lieberman et al. 1996; Raich et al. 1997). The decrease aligns with a continuous species shift from lowland forests, to lower, middle and upper montane forests (Gentry et al. 1995). Leaf area index (LAI) also decreases with elevation from lowland to upper montane forest (Kitayama and Aiba 2002).