Webcasting Made Interactive: Persistent Chat for Text Dialogue During and About Learning Events

  • Ronald Baecker
  • David Fono
  • Lillian Blume
  • Christopher Collins
  • Delia Couto
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4558)

Abstract

This paper presents a “persistent chat” extension to the ePresence Interactive Media webcasting infrastructure to support real-time commenting on and discussing of issues that arise during a learning event, followed by ongoing asynchronous dialogue about these issues while viewing the archives after the event. We report encouraging results of a field study of use of the system by students and a teaching assistant in a computer science class on communication skills, which encouraged students to review, think critically about, and improve their public speaking abilities.

Keywords

webcasting streaming media eLearning digital media digital video persistent chat asynchronous communications public speaking 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald Baecker
    • 1
    • 2
  • David Fono
    • 1
  • Lillian Blume
    • 1
  • Christopher Collins
    • 1
    • 2
  • Delia Couto
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science 
  2. 2.Knowledge Media Design Institute, Univ. of Toronto, 40 St. George St. #7228, Toronto Ontario M5S2E4Canada

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