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What Really Is Going on? Review, Critique and Extension of Situation Awareness Theory

  • Paul M. Salmon
  • Neville A. Stanton
  • Daniel P. Jenkins
  • Guy H. Walker
  • Mark S. Young
  • Amardeep Aujla
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4562)

Abstract

Theoretically, Situation Awareness (SA) remains predominantly an individual construct. The majority of the models presented in the literature focus on SA from an individual perspective and in comparison, the concept of team SA has received less attention. SA in complex, collaborative environments thus remains a challenge for the human factors community, both in terms of the development of theoretical perspectives and of valid measures, and also in the development of guidelines for system, training and procedure design. This article presents a review and critique of what is currently known about SA and team SA, including a comparison of the most prominent individual and team models presented in the literature. In conclusion, we argue that recently proposed systems level Distributed Situation Awareness (DSA) approaches are the most suited to describing and assessing SA in real world collaborative environments.

Keywords

Situation Awareness Teams Collaborative Systems 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul M. Salmon
    • 1
  • Neville A. Stanton
    • 1
  • Daniel P. Jenkins
    • 1
  • Guy H. Walker
    • 1
  • Mark S. Young
    • 1
  • Amardeep Aujla
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence Technology Centre for Human Factors Integration (DTC-HFI), Brunel University, BIT Lab, School of Engineering and Design, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PHUK

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