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Digital Human Modelling: A Global Vision and a European Perspective

  • Gordon J. Clapworthy
  • Peter Kohl
  • Hans Gregerson
  • S. R. Thomas
  • Marco Viceconti
  • D. R. Hose
  • D. Pinney
  • John Fenner
  • K. McCormack
  • P. Lawford
  • S. Van Sint Jan
  • S. Waters
  • P. Coveney
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4561)

Abstract

The Physiome is an umbrella term that refers to human modelling with mathematics and computational methods, accommodating cross-disciplinary science (chemistry, biology, physics) and a breadth of dimensional and temporal scale (sub-cellular to organs, sub-microsecond to tens-of-years). The Virtual Physiological Human is a European initiative that is intended to provide a unifying architecture for the integration and cooperation of multi-scale physiome models, thereby creating a predictive platform for the description of human beings in silico. Unlike the Genome, the challenge of the Physiome may be almost unbounded, as the desire for increased detail imposes a continuing pressure for ever-finer data granularity, and the necessary Information Technology (IT) infrastructure spawns innovations that surpass conventional solutions. It is foreseen that maturing physiome activities will increasingly influence medicine, biomedical research and commercial developments, and the central role of IT highlights the need for a specific and robust IT infrastructure.

The European Commission has experience of supporting challenging technical endeavours through its Framework Programmes of research, and in the forthcoming 7th Framework Programme, it will invite researchers from within and outside Europe to unite in seeking solutions to key issues of the Physiome. The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) investment programme will establish the necessary infrastructure and address the grand technical challenges identified by experts. This paper examines the background to the strategy and the ways in which the programme’s structure has been determined.

Keywords

Physiome Virtual Physiological Human infrastructure modelling 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gordon J. Clapworthy
    • 1
  • Peter Kohl
    • 2
  • Hans Gregerson
    • 3
  • S. R. Thomas
    • 4
  • Marco Viceconti
    • 5
  • D. R. Hose
    • 6
  • D. Pinney
    • 6
  • John Fenner
    • 6
  • K. McCormack
    • 6
  • P. Lawford
    • 6
  • S. Van Sint Jan
    • 7
  • S. Waters
    • 8
  • P. Coveney
    • 9
  1. 1.Univ. of BedfordshireUK
  2. 2.University of OxfordUK
  3. 3.Aalborg HospitalDenmark
  4. 4.Centre National de la Recherche ScientifiqueFrance
  5. 5.Istituti Ortopedici RizzoliItaly
  6. 6.Univ. of Sheffield, UK, Dept of Medical Physics, University of Sheffield, Floor I, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, Sheffield, S10 2JFUK
  7. 7.Univ Libre BruxellesBelgium
  8. 8.University of NottinghamUK
  9. 9.University College LondonUK

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