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A Crew Scheduling Approach for Public Transit Enhanced with Aspects from Vehicle Scheduling

  • Vitali Gintner
  • Natalia Kliewer
  • Leena Suhl
Part of the Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems book series (LNE, volume 600)

Abstract

This paper presents a new approach for solving the crew scheduling problem in public transit. The approach is based on interaction with the corresponding vehicle scheduling problem. We use a model of the vehicle scheduling problem which is based on a time-space network formulation. An advantage of this procedure is that it produces a bundle of optimal vehicle schedules, implicitly given by the solution flow. In our approach, we give this degree of freedom to the crew scheduling phase, where a vehicle schedule is selected that is most consistent with the objectives of crew scheduling.

Keywords

Schedule Problem Column Generation Master Problem Public Transit Crew Schedule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vitali Gintner
    • 1
  • Natalia Kliewer
    • 2
  • Leena Suhl
    • 2
  1. 1.Decision Support & Operations Research Lab and International Graduate School for Dynamic Intelligent SystemsUniversity of PaderbornPaderbornGermany
  2. 2.Decision Support & Operations Research LabUniversity of PaderbornPaderbornGermany

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