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An Interactive Entertainment System Usable by Elderly People with Dementia

  • Norman Alm
  • Arlene Astell
  • Gary Gowans
  • Richard Dye
  • Maggie Ellis
  • Phillip Vaughan
  • Alan F. Newell
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4555)

Abstract

As the population profile in most part of the world is more and more weighted towards older people, the incidence of dementia will continue to increase. Dementia is marked by a general cognitive decline, and in particular the impairment of working (short-term) memory. Finding ways to engage people with dementia in stimulating but safe activities which they can do without the help of a carer would be beneficial both to them and to their caregivers. We are developing an interactive entertainment system designed to be used alone by a person with dementia without caregiver assistance. We have piloted a number of interactive virtual environments and activities both with people with dementia and professionals in the field of dementia care. We report the results of this pilot work and consider the further questions to be addressed in developing an engaging, multimedia activity for people with dementia to use independently.

Keywords

Dementia assistive technology cognitive prostheses multimedia touchscreens 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Alm
    • 1
  • Arlene Astell
    • 2
  • Gary Gowans
    • 3
  • Richard Dye
    • 1
  • Maggie Ellis
    • 2
  • Phillip Vaughan
    • 3
  • Alan F. Newell
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computing, University of Dundee, Dundee, ScotlandUK
  2. 2.School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, ScotlandUK
  3. 3.School of Design, University of Dundee, Dundee, ScotlandUK

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