Advertisement

The Effect of Fatigue on Cognitive and Psychomotor Skills of Surgical Residents

  • Kanav Kahol
  • Mark Smith
  • Stephanie Mayes
  • Mary Deka
  • Vikram Deka
  • John Ferrara
  • Sethuraman Panchanathan
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4565)

Abstract

Surgical residents are exposed to a significant amount of cognitive load during call. While various efforts have been made to quantify the effect of fatigue and sleep deprivation on the psychomotor skills of surgical residents, there is very little investigations into the effect of these factors on cognitive skills. However, this is an important issue in medical curriculum design, as much of the medical errors are procedural in nature and are not psychomotor. In this paper, we present a study that aimed to quantify the effect of fatigue on cognitive skills. We employed hand movement data for developing a proficiency measure of surgical skill. The difference in proficiencies measured through hand movement post call and pre call was determined. The simulation tasks were designed to challenge working memory, attention of the user. The results showed a significant difference in hand movement proficiencies as well as behavioral errors pre and post-call. EEG Data was also gathered during simulation tasks pre and post call through the B-Alert® Bluetooth EEG technology. The B-Alert® software was analyzed to reveal ratings of alertness/drowsiness, engagement, mental workload and distraction. The results showed statistically significant difference in EEG ratings in pre call and post call condition.

Keywords

Sleep Deprivation Hand Movement Senior Surgeon Surgical Resident Mental Workload 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Behrenz, K., Monga, M.: Fatigue in Pregnancy: A comparative study. American Journal of Perinatology 16(4), 185–188 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Rosen, J., Brown, J.D., Chang, L., Sinanan, M., Hannaford, B.: Generalized Approach for Modeling Minimally Invasive Surgery as a Stochastic Process Using a Discrete Markov Model. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering 53, 399–413 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tendulkar, A., Victorino, G., Chong, T., Bullard, M., Liu, T., Harken, A.: Quantification of Surgical Resident Stress "On Call". Journal of the American College of Surgeons 201(4), 560 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kanav Kahol
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mark Smith
    • 1
  • Stephanie Mayes
    • 1
  • Mary Deka
    • 1
  • Vikram Deka
    • 1
  • John Ferrara
    • 1
  • Sethuraman Panchanathan
    • 2
  1. 1.Phoenix Integrated Surgical Residency Program, SimET Center, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix Arizona 
  2. 2.Arizona State University 

Personalised recommendations