A Statistical Model of Head Asymmetry in Infants with Deformational Plagiocephaly

  • Stéphanie Lanche
  • Tron A. Darvann
  • Hildur Ólafsdóttir
  • Nuno V. Hermann
  • Andrea E. Van Pelt
  • Daniel Govier
  • Marissa J. Tenenbaum
  • Sybill Naidoo
  • Per Larsen
  • Sven Kreiborg
  • Rasmus Larsen
  • Alex A. Kane
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4522)

Abstract

Deformational plagiocephaly is a term describing cranial a-symmetry and deformation commonly seen in infants. The purpose of this work was to develop a methodology for assessment and modelling of head asymmetry. The clinical population consisted of 38 infants for whom 3-dimensional surface scans of the head had been obtained both before and after their helmet orthotic treatment. Non-rigid registration of a symmetric template to each of the scans provided detailed point correspondence between scans. A new asymmetry measure was defined and was used in order to quantify and localize the asymmetry of each infant’s head, and again employed to estimate the improvement of asymmetry after the helmet therapy. A statistical model of head asymmetry was developed (PCA). The main modes of variation were in good agreement with clinical observations, and the model provided an excellent and instructive quantitative description of the asymmetry present in the dataset.

Keywords

Midsagittal Plane Asymmetry Measure Deformational Plagiocephaly Positional Plagiocephaly Helmet Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stéphanie Lanche
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tron A. Darvann
    • 1
  • Hildur Ólafsdóttir
    • 2
    • 1
  • Nuno V. Hermann
    • 4
    • 1
  • Andrea E. Van Pelt
    • 5
  • Daniel Govier
    • 5
  • Marissa J. Tenenbaum
    • 5
  • Sybill Naidoo
    • 5
  • Per Larsen
    • 1
  • Sven Kreiborg
    • 4
    • 1
  • Rasmus Larsen
    • 2
  • Alex A. Kane
    • 5
  1. 1.3D-Laboratory, (School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen; Copenhagen University Hospital; Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, Technical University of Denmark)Denmark
  2. 2.Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, Technical, University of DenmarkDenmark
  3. 3.Ecole Supérieure de Chimie Physique Electronique de Lyon (ESCPE Lyon)France
  4. 4.Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Clinical Genetics, School of Dentistry, University of CopenhagenDenmark
  5. 5.Division of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MOUSA

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