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MRI-based Visualisation of Orbital Fat Deformation During Eye Motion

  • Charl P. Botha
  • Thijs de Graaf
  • Sander Schutte
  • Ronald Root
  • Piotr Wielopolski
  • Frans C.T. van der Helm
  • Huibert J. Simonsz
  • Frits H. Post
Part of the Mathematics and Visualization book series (MATHVISUAL)

Summary

Orbital fat, or the fat behind the eye, plays an important role in eye movements. In order to gain a better understanding of orbital fat mobility during eye motion, MRI datasets of the eyes of two healthy subjects were acquired respectively in seven and fourteen different directions of gaze. After semi-automatic rigid registration, the Demons deformable registration algorithm was used to derive time-dependent three-dimensional deformation vector fields from these datasets. Visualisation techniques were applied to these datasets in order to investigate fat mobility in specific regions of interest in the first subject. A qualitative analysis of the first subject showed that in two of the three regions of interest, fat moved half as much as the embedded structures. In other words, when the muscles and the optic nerve that are embedded in the fat move, the fat partly moves along with these structures and partly flows around them. In the second subject, a quantitative analysis was performed which showed a relation between the distance behind the sciera and the extent to which fat moves along with the optic nerve.

Keywords

Optic Nerve Central Direction Deformable Registration Deformation Vector Vector Dataset 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charl P. Botha
    • 1
  • Thijs de Graaf
    • 2
  • Sander Schutte
    • 2
  • Ronald Root
    • 2
  • Piotr Wielopolski
    • 3
  • Frans C.T. van der Helm
    • 2
  • Huibert J. Simonsz
    • 4
  • Frits H. Post
    • 1
  1. 1.Data VisualisationDelft University of TechnologyDelft
  2. 2.Biomechanical EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelft
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyErasmus Medical CentreRotterdam
  4. 4.Department of OphthalmologyErasmus Medical CentreRotterdamThe Netherlands

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