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A Note on the Feasibility of Generalized Universal Composability

(Extended Abstract)
  • Andrew C. C. Yao
  • Frances F. Yao
  • Yunlei Zhao
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4484)

Abstract

We clarify the potential limitation of the general feasibility for generalized universal composability (GUC) proposed in the recent work [8], and discuss a general principle for fully realizing universal composability. This in particular demonstrates the hardness of achieving generalized universal composability, and prevents potential misinterpretation in applications. We also propose some fixing approaches, which involve a source/session-authentic ID-based trapdoor commitment scheme via the hash-then-commit paradigm that could possibly be of independent interest.

Keywords

Commitment Scheme Common Input Copy Message Cryptology ePrint Archive Common Reference String 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew C. C. Yao
    • 1
  • Frances F. Yao
    • 2
  • Yunlei Zhao
    • 3
  1. 1.Center of Advanced Study, Tsinghua University, BeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Computer Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong KongChina
  3. 3.Software School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433China

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