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The Kinetic 3D Voronoi Diagram: A Tool for Simulating Environmental Processes

  • Hugo Ledoux
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

Simulations of environmental processes are usually modelled by partial differential equations that are approximated with numerical methods, based on regular grids. An attractive alternative for simulating a fluid flow is the Free-Lagrange Method (FLM). In this paper, I discuss the use of the FLM—based on the Voronoi diagram (VD)—for the modelling of fluid flow in three dimensions (e.g. the movement of underground water or of pollution plumes in the ocean). Such a technique requires the kinetic three-dimensional VD, which is a VD for which the points are allowed to move freely in space. I present a new algorithm for the movement of points in a three-dimensional VD, and show that it can be relatively easy to implement as it is the extension of a simple two-dimensional algorithm.

Keywords

Voronoi Diagram Computational Geometry Delaunay Triangulation Voronoi Cell Dissipative Particle Dynamic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugo Ledoux
    • 1
  1. 1.OTB-section GIS TechnologyDelft University of TechnologyDelftthe Netherlands

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