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Playing with Maude

  • Manuel Clavel
  • Francisco Durán
  • Steven Eker
  • Patrick Lincoln
  • Narciso Martí-Oliet
  • José Meseguer
  • Carolyn Talcott
  • Miguel Palomino
  • Alberto Verdejo
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4350)

Abstract

Mathematical games and puzzles of all sorts constitute an important subclass of mathematical problems, with a long tradition and an extensive literature [20, 135, 11, 287]. Most of them have in common the fact that they are easy to state and understand, which does not mean that a precise solution is always trivial to find.

In this chapter we make use of Maude system modules to present and illustrate some general techniques that allow solving a diverse enough selection of these problems. We are not concerned with finding neat and concise mathematical solutions, but rather we would like to find out how easy it is to express those problems in the rewriting logic formalism underlying Maude, and how far we can go in their resolution by the use of just brute force and as little ingenuity as possible. In this regard, a clear conclusion is that many of these problems can be represented/specified in Maude in a much simpler way than it would be possible in more conventional languages.

Keywords

Natural Number Search Initial Safe Position Strategy Language State Explosion Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manuel Clavel
    • 1
  • Francisco Durán
    • 2
  • Steven Eker
    • 3
  • Patrick Lincoln
    • 3
  • Narciso Martí-Oliet
    • 1
  • José Meseguer
    • 4
  • Carolyn Talcott
    • 5
  • Miguel Palomino
  • Alberto Verdejo
  1. 1.Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Informática, Departamento de Sistemas Informáticos y Computación, s/n 28040 MadridSpain
  2. 2.Universidad de Málaga, Departamento de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computación, Boulevard Louis Pasteur, s/n. Campus de Teatinos, 29071 MálagaSpain
  3. 3.SRI International, Computer Science Laboratory, 333 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493USA
  4. 4.University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Computer Science, Siebel Center for Computer Science, 201 N. Goodwin, Urbana, IL 61801-2302USA
  5. 5.SRI InternationalUSA

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