Evolutionary Methods for Melodic Sequences Generation from Non-linear Dynamic Systems

  • Eleonora Bilotta
  • Pietro Pantano
  • Enrico Cupellini
  • Costantino Rizzuti
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4448)

Abstract

The work concerns using evolutionary methods to evolve melodic sequences, obtained through a music generative approach from Chua’s circuit, a non-linear dynamic system, universal paradigm for studying chaos. The main idea was to investigate how to turn potential aesthetical musical forms, generated by chaotic attractors, in melodic patterns, according to the western musical tradition. A single attractor was chosen from the extended gallery of the Chua’s dynamical systems. A specific codification scheme was used to map the attractor’s space of phases into the musical pitch domain. A genetic algorithm was used to search throughout all possible solutions in the space of the attractor’s parameters. Musical patterns were selected by a suitable fitness function. Experimental data show a progressive increase of the fitness values.

Keywords

Chua’s Attractor Genetic Algorithm Generative Music 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eleonora Bilotta
    • 1
  • Pietro Pantano
    • 2
  • Enrico Cupellini
    • 3
  • Costantino Rizzuti
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Linguistics, University of Calabria, Cubo 17b Via P. Bucci, Arcavacata di Rende (CS) 87036Italy
  2. 2.Department of Mathematics, University of Calabria, Cubo 30b Via P. Bucci, Arcavacata di Rende (CS) 87036Italy
  3. 3.Department of Mathematics, University of Torino, Via Carlo Alberto 10, Torino 10123Italy

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