Teaching Software Modeling in a Simulated Project Environment

  • Robert Szmurło
  • Michał Śmiałek
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4364)

Abstract

Teaching software engineering in the academia always faces the problem of inability to show problems of real life development projects. The courses seem to be unable to properly show the need of using software modeling as important means of coping with complexity and handling communication within the project. The paper presents format of a course that tries to overcome this. It focuses on application of modeling tools in a realistic software engineering environment. The objective is to teach best practices of software design and implementation with the use of UML. The students can practice design and communication techniques based around CASE tools in teams of 12 to 14 people. The paper summarizes 5 years of experience in teaching modeling with CASE tools. Authors present a concept of how to simulate the roles of architects, designers and programmers as close to reality as possible. The paper also discusses the problems of organizing laboratory work for a large group of students. Authors present the tasks and their arrangement during the course.

Keywords

software modeling education CASE tools project communication UML 

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Szmurło
    • 1
  • Michał Śmiałek
    • 1
  1. 1.Warsaw University of Technology, WarsawPoland

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