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Inner Ear

  • Andreas Arnold
  • Wolfgang Arnold
  • Roberto Bovo
  • Uwe Ganzer
  • Karl-Friedrich Hamann
  • Salvatore Iurato
  • Jan Kiefer
  • Kerstin Lamm
  • Walter Livi
  • Alessandro Martini
  • Gerard M. O’Donoghue
Chapter
  • 3.2k Downloads
Part of the European Manual of Medicine book series (EUROMANUAL)

Abstract

Herpes zoster oticus, herpes zoster cephalicus, Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

Keywords

Hearing Loss Sensorineural Hearing Loss Motion Sickness Cochlear Implantation Round Window Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Arnold
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Arnold
    • 2
  • Roberto Bovo
    • 3
  • Uwe Ganzer
    • 4
  • Karl-Friedrich Hamann
    • 5
  • Salvatore Iurato
    • 6
  • Jan Kiefer
    • 7
  • Kerstin Lamm
    • 8
  • Walter Livi
    • 9
  • Alessandro Martini
    • 10
  • Gerard M. O’Donoghue
    • 11
  1. 1.Universitätsklinik für HNO Hals- und KopfchirurgieInselspitalBernSwitzerland
  2. 2.Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Oto-Rhino-LaryngologyTechnische Universität MünchenMunichGermany
  3. 3.Audiology and Phoniatrics UnitUniversity Hospital of FerraraFerraraItaly
  4. 4.Hals-Nasen-OhrenklinikKlinikum der Heinrich-Heine-UniversitätDüsseldorfGermany
  5. 5.Klinikum rechts der Isar, HNO-Universitäts-KlinikTechnische Universität MünchenMunichGermany
  6. 6.Department of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of BariBariItaly
  7. 7.Klinikum rechts der Isar, Klinik und Poliklinik für Hals-Nasen-OhrenheilkundeTechnische Universität MünchenMunichGermany
  8. 8.Hearing and Vestibular Disorders and TinnitusClinic for Oto-Rhino-LaryngologyMunichGermany
  9. 9.Policlinico “Le Scotte“, ENT DepartmentUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  10. 10.Dipartimento di Discipline Medico-Chirurgiche della Comunicazione e del Comportamento, Sezione di OtorinolaringoiatriaUniversity of FerreraFerraraItaly
  11. 11.Department of OtolaryngologyQueen’s Medical CentreNottinghamUK

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