Compliance Control for Biped Walking on Rough Terrain

  • Masaki Ogino
  • Hiroyuki Toyama
  • Sawa Fuke
  • Norbert Michael Mayer
  • Ayako Watanabe
  • Minoru Asada
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5001)

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a control system that changes the compliance based on the walking speed to stabilize biped walking on rough terrain. The proposed system changes walking modes depends on its walking speed. In the downhill terrain, when the walking speed increases, the stiffness of the ankle in the support phase is controlled so as to brake the increased speed. In the uphill terrain, when the walking speed decreases, the stiffness of the waist joint is controlled and the desired trajectory for the supported leg is shifted so as not to falls down backward. To validate the efficiency of the proposed system, the stability of walking with the proposed system is examined in the two dimensional dynamics simulation. It is shown that the robot with the proposed system can walk in the more variable rough terrain and with the broader walking speed than without changing the stiffness of the joints.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaki Ogino
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Toyama
    • 2
  • Sawa Fuke
    • 1
    • 2
  • Norbert Michael Mayer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ayako Watanabe
    • 2
  • Minoru Asada
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.JST ERATO Asada ProjectOsakaJapan
  2. 2.Osaka UniversityOsakaJapan

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