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Dynamic Planet pp 115-122 | Cite as

GPS/GLONASS orbit determination based on combined microwave and SLR data analysis

  • C. Urschl
  • G. Beutler
  • W. Gurtner
  • U. Hugentobler
  • S. Schaer
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 130)

Abstract

The combination of space-geodetic techniques is considered as an important tool for improving the accuracy and consistency of the resulting geodetic products. For GNSS satellites, tracking data is regularly collected by both the microwave and the SLR observation technique. In this study, we investigate the impact of combined analysis of microwave and SLR observations on precise orbit determination of GNSS satellites. Combined orbits are generated for the two GPS satellites equipped with Laser retroreflector arrays and for three GLONASS satellites that are currently observed by the 1LRS network. The combination is done at the observation level, implying that all parameters common to both techniques are derived from both observation types. Several experimental orbits are determined using different observation weights. As the well-known 5 cm-bias between SLR measurements and GPS microwave orbits is unexplained, SLR range biases as well as satellite retroreflector offsets are estimated in addition to the orbital parameters. The different orbit solutions are then compared in order to determine whether and to which extent the SLR measurements influence a microwave orbit primarily derived from microwave observations.

Key words

GNSS orbit determination Multi-technique combination GPS SLR 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Urschl
    • 1
  • G. Beutler
    • 1
  • W. Gurtner
    • 1
  • U. Hugentobler
    • 1
  • S. Schaer
    • 1
  1. 1.Astronomical InstituteUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland

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