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Mathematical Models of Autonomous Logistic Processes

  • Bernd Scholz-Reiter
  • Fabian Wirth
  • Michael Freitag
  • Sergey Dashkovskiy
  • Thomas Jagalski
  • Christoph de Beer
  • Björn Rüffer

Abstract

There exist various approaches to the mathematical modelling of dynamic processes occurring in shop floor logistics. These include methods from queuing theory or use dynamical systems given by ordinary or partial differential equations (fluid models). If the number of elements within the process is large it can become prohibitively complex to analyse and optimize a given logistic process or the corresponding mathematical model using global strategies. A new approach is to provide for an autonomy of various smaller entities within the logistic network, i.e. for the possibility of certain elements to make their own decisions. This necessitates changes in the appropriate mathematical models and opens the question of stability of the systems that are designed. In this paper we discuss the fundamental concepts of autonomy within a logistic network and mathematical tools that can be used to model this property. Some remarks concerning the stability properties of the models are made.

Keywords

Logistic Process Shop Floor Autonomous Control Logistic Network Production Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernd Scholz-Reiter
    • 1
  • Fabian Wirth
    • 1
  • Michael Freitag
    • 1
  • Sergey Dashkovskiy
    • 2
  • Thomas Jagalski
    • 1
  • Christoph de Beer
    • 1
  • Björn Rüffer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Planning and Control of Production Systems, BIBAUniversity of BremenGermany
  2. 2.Center for Industrial MathematicsUniversity of BremenGermany

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