Humanist Computing: Modelling with Words, Concepts, and Behaviours

  • Jonathan Rossiter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2873)

Abstract

In this paper we present a new approach to the modelling of data and knowledge called Humanist Computing. We describe how the general principle of Humanist Computing, namely the modelling with words, concepts and behaviours defines a hierarchy of methods which extends from the low level data-driven modelling with words to the high level fusion of knowledge in the context of human behaviours. We explore this hierarchy and focus on a number of levels in the hierarchy. For each level we describe the general Humanist Computing approach and give specific examples based either on approximations to the real-world or the real-world itself.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Rossiter
    • 1
  1. 1.AI Research Group, Department of Engineering MathematicsUniversity of BristolBristolUK

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