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Agents across Cultures

  • Sabine Payr
  • Robert Trappl
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2792)

Abstract

The paper presents a short overview of the problems involved and solutions offered on the issue of adapting agents to different cultures. First, three different domains of human-agent interaction are distinguished – agent culture, user culture, and hybrid culture – in order to determine the degree to which IVAs have to adapt to cultural diversity. Turning to user culture in what follows, we outline the levels of agent architecture where such adaptation should be taken care of in the design process. We conclude with a couple of ”Agent Culture Hypotheses”.

Keywords

Facial Expression Agent Culture Role Behavior Agent Architecture Interface Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sabine Payr
    • 1
  • Robert Trappl
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Austrian Research Institute for Artificial Intelligence (OeFAI) 
  2. 2.Department for Medical Cybernetics and Artificial Intelligence (IMKAI)University of Vienna 

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