Happy Chatbot, Happy User

  • Gábor Tatai
  • Annamária Csordás
  • Árpád Kiss
  • Attila Szaló
  • László Laufer
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2792)

Abstract

We compare our own embodied conversational agent (ECA) scheme, BotCom, with seven other complex Internet-based ECAs according to recently-published information about them, and highlight some important attributes that have received little attention in the construction of realistic ECAs. BotCom incorporates the use of emotions, humor and complex information services. We cover issues that are likely to be of greatest interest for developers of ECAs that, like BotCom, are directed towards intensive commercial use.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gábor Tatai
    • 1
  • Annamária Csordás
    • 2
  • Árpád Kiss
    • 2
  • Attila Szaló
    • 2
  • László Laufer
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.AITIA Inc.BudapestHungary
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyELTE University of SciencesBudapestHungary

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