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Comprehensive physiological identification of cardiovascular regulation enables to restore and correct pathological regulation

  • Masaru Sugimachi
  • Toru Kawada
  • Toshiaki Shishido
  • Meihua Li
  • Can Zheng
  • Kenji Sunagawa
Conference paper
Part of the IFMBE Proceedings book series (IFMBE, volume 14)

Abstract

There is growing evidence that abnormal cardiovascular regulation plays a vital role in the maintenance and progression of heart disease, e.g., heart failure. Correcting these abnormalities is likely to help improve pathophysiology and survival. We have developed a bionic system, an artificial device designed for integration into native human physiological systems. By communicating with the physiological regulatory system, especially through the nervous system, bionic systems enables restoration of lost function and correction of abnormal function.

Development of bionic systems requires the detailed knowledge of the characteristics of the native system. Native systems have a number of extremely complex factors such as history-dependence, feedback nature, multiplicity and interaction of inputs, nonlinearity, and distributed nature. To overcome these, we made use of a “white-noise approach” and succeeded in functionally identifying the native arterial baroreflex with sufficient precision that one can reproduce a native system artificially.

Using the identified characteristics, we developed a bionic baroreflex system and succeeded in stabilizing pressure against hypotensive stimuli even in animals without a functional baroreflex system. Bionic therapeutic strategy also enabled us to correct the abnormal regulatory function. This correction improved inhibited cardiac remodeling and survival of animals with chronic heart failure.

From the physiological point of view, the success of bionic systems implies that the characteristics thus determined reflect the comprehensive natures of the physiological regulatory system, not only the limited aspects of the system. The advantage of using “white-noise approach” in determining the total picture of complex systems holds also for cardiovascular regulatory system in animals. Our findings showed that developed bionic systems can help deepen our understanding of physiological systems as well as open up new therapeutic strategies against various diseases.

Keywords

Functional replacement White noise method Heart failure 

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaru Sugimachi
    • 1
  • Toru Kawada
    • 1
  • Toshiaki Shishido
    • 1
  • Meihua Li
    • 1
  • Can Zheng
    • 1
  • Kenji Sunagawa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Cardiovascular Dynamics, Advanced Medical Engineering CenterNational Cardiovascular Center Research InstituteSuitaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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