Biomedical Informatics: From Past Experiences to the Infobiomed Network of Excellence

  • Victor Maojo
  • Fernando Martin-Sánchez
  • José María Barreiro
  • Carlos Diaz
  • Ferran Sanz
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3337)

Abstract

Medical Informatics (MI) and Bioinformatics (BI) are now facing, after various decades of ongoing research and activities, a crucial time, where both disciplines could merge, increase collaboration or follow separate roads. In this paper, we provide a vision of past experiences in both areas, pointing out significant achievements in both fields. Then, scientific and technological aspects are considered, following an ACM report on computing. Following this approach, both MI and BI are analyzed, from three perspectives: design, abstraction, and theories, showing differences between them. An overview of training experiences in Biomedical Informatics is also included, showing current trends. In this regard, we present the INFOBIOMED network of excellence, funded by the European Commission, as an example of a systematic effort to support a synergy between both disciplines, in the new area of Biomedical Informatics.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victor Maojo
    • 1
  • Fernando Martin-Sánchez
    • 2
  • José María Barreiro
    • 1
  • Carlos Diaz
    • 3
  • Ferran Sanz
    • 3
  1. 1.Biomedical Informatics Group, Artificial Intelligence LabPolytechnical University of MadridSpain
  2. 2.Bioinformatics Unit, Institute of Health Carlos IIIMajadahonda, MadridSpain
  3. 3.Biomedical Informatics Research Group, Municipal Institue of Medical Research – IMIMBarcelonaSpain

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