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Building Grid Applications and Portals: An Approach Based on Components, Web Services and Workflow Tools

  • D. Gannon
  • L. Fang
  • G. Kandaswamy
  • D. Kodeboyina
  • S. Krishnan
  • B. Plale
  • A. Slominski
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3149)

Abstract

Large scale Grid applications are often composed a distributed collection of parallel simulation codes, instrument monitors, data miners, rendering and visualization tools. For example, consider a severe storm prediction system driven by a grid of weather sensors. Typically these applications are very complex to build, so users interact with them through a Grid portal front end. This talk outlines an approach based on a web service component architecture for building these applications and portal interfaces. We illustrate how the traditional parallel application can be wrapped by a web service factory and integrated into complex workflows. Additional issues that are addressed include: grid security, web service tools and workflow composition tools. The talk will try to outline several important classes of unsolved problems and possible new research directions for building grid applications.

Keywords

Grid Service Grid Application Factory Service Portal Server Legacy Application 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Gannon
    • 1
  • L. Fang
    • 1
  • G. Kandaswamy
    • 1
  • D. Kodeboyina
    • 1
  • S. Krishnan
    • 1
  • B. Plale
    • 1
  • A. Slominski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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