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Shock Waves pp 455-460 | Cite as

Experimental study of diverging and converging spherical shock waves and their interaction with product gases

  • S. H. R. Hosseini
  • K. Takayama
Conference paper

Abstract

The paper reports an experimental study of production and propagation of diverging and converging spherical shock waves. In order to quantitatively observe spherical shock waves and the flow field behind them, an aspheric spherical transparent test section was designed and constructed. This 150 mm inner-diameter aspheric lens shaped test section permits the collimated visualization laser light beam to traverse the test section parallel and emerge parallel. Spherical diverging shock waves were produced at the center of the spherical test section. In order to generate shock waves, irradiation of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam on micro silver azide pellets were used. The weight of silver azide pellets ranged from 1 to 10 mg, with their corresponding energy of 1.9 to 19 J. Pressure histories at two points over the test section were measured. After reflection of spherical shock wave from the test section, a converging spherical shock wave was produced. Double exposure holographic interferometry and time resolved high speed photography were used for flow visualization. The whole sequence of diverging and converging spherical shock waves propagation and their interaction with product gases were studied.

Keywords

Shock Wave Test Section Pressure History Spherical Shock Wave Silver Azide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. H. R. Hosseini
    • 1
  • K. Takayama
    • 1
  1. 1.Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center, Institute of Fluid ScienceTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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