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Shock Waves pp 371-376 | Cite as

Unsteady drag force measurement in shock tube

  • H. Tanno
  • T. Komuro
  • K. Sato
  • K. Itoh
  • S. Ueda
  • K. Takayama
  • H. Ojima
Conference paper

Abstract

An aerodynamic force measurement technique with an extremely short test time was developed. A signal recovery method based on frequency domain de-convolution technique was applied on a direct acceleration measurement with a weakly-restrained test model. With the technique, an unsteady drag force of an 80mm diameter sphere model was measured when a planar shock wave of M s=1.22 passed the sphere in a vertical shock tube of 300 × 300mm square cross section. The measured drag force was evaluated with a numerical simulation, the reliability of which was verified with pressure and optical measurements. The evaluation revealed that the present force measurement technique has enough accuracy and time resolution for phenomenon with a duration of a few hundred μS. Additionally, the unsteady force measurement of a sphere revealed that drag force had been negative for approximately two hundred μs after the shock wave passed over the sphere. Numerical analysis showed that this negative drag was caused by the high pressure produced by shock waves converging at the lower part of the sphere.

Keywords

Shock Wave Drag Force Shock Tube Force Measurement Incident Shock Wave 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Tanno
    • 1
  • T. Komuro
    • 1
  • K. Sato
    • 1
  • K. Itoh
    • 1
  • S. Ueda
    • 1
  • K. Takayama
    • 2
  • H. Ojima
    • 2
  1. 1.Japan Aerospace Exploration AgencyKakuda Space Propulsion CenterKakuda, MiyagiJapan
  2. 2.Shock Wave Research Center, Institute of Fluid ScienceTohoku UniversitySendai, MiyagiJapan

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